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The Optimist Club, Part 1: Short-Term Perspective of the COVID-19 Challenge for Veterinary Education

Educational realities for veterinary schools have evolved very rapidly over the last few weeks of the expanding COVID-19 pandemic.

Combatting the Forgetting Curve: Teach Students to Fish!

A recent post from the LearnDash blog reminded me that one of the biggest challenges content-rich veterinary curricula have is RETENTION.  Putting aside that the LearnDash post focuses on online education, the learning brain functions in similar ways for all types of educational formats.  

https://www.learndash.com/combating-the-forgetting-curve-in-online-education/

"Engineering" a Veterinarian: Re-Evaluating the Path from Prerequisites to Competency

A recent educational survey research article was just published in the Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association.  Opinion pieces on veterinary education aside, research articles of this nature are relatively rare for this journal, so its presence is notable in and of itself

LearnDash CEO E-Learning Predictions for 2017: Did They Come True?

Justin Ferriman, CEO of LearnDash, reviewed his predictions for e-learning in 2017.   He suggests that he "nailed it" by predicting 2 major developments this year:

Innovation Around Micro-Learning: development of "micro-content," such as short videos or bite-sized learning modules, such as those us developed and curated by VetMedAcademy.  Help us keep the trend going.  Recommend or provide links to excellent content for students worldwide.

TED TALK: THE GLOBAL LEARNING CRISIS

I thought I’d pass along this recent very powerful TED Talk. In this blog, we’ve talked about the international evaluation of student learning using the international PISA exam, an exam given to 15 year-olds around the world. This exam also includes elements assessing critical thinking. Ms. Karboul references the higher standing of countries that have invested and focused on student learning.  If there is one message, it is that learning takes a village.

LOSING THE ‘SAGE ON THE STAGE’ – IS IT TIME?

Photo from the Washington Post, July 29, 2017

Today’s article by Lenny Bernstein in the Washington Post describes the University of Vermont Medical School moving almost totally away from lectures in its curriculum. In fact, it is following the trend in medical schools started by Case Western University 13 years ago.

THESIS: “EDUCATORS WILL (SHOULD) STOP INSISTING ON THE INEQUALITY OF OUTCOMES”

In the following series of videos, Dr. Bill Cope of the College of Education at the University of Illinois, calls for educators to move away from student assessments that attempt to put students along a bell-shaped curve of educational achievement, seeking rather to move all students towards similar proficiency (mastery).

IS THERE A LESSON FOR VET MEDICINE?: “EDUCATING IN A NEURODIVERSE WORLD”

If you haven’t taken the opportunity before, I encourage you to take a look at the learning platform developed by TED-Ed, as well as to listen to a very insightful presentation by Brian Kinghorn accompanied by review and thought questions, and links allowing the learner to “Dig Deeper” into the subject.  I’ve even added a veterinary medicine-centric open-ended thought question under the “Discuss” section at the end of those by the author of this lesson.

STUDY REPORTED BY THE WALL STREET JOURNAL: MOST STUDENTS CANNOT DISTINGUISH BETWEEN REAL AND FAKE NEWS

A Stanford University study,  reported by the Wall Street Journal and summarized in the following video link, demonstrated that 82% of almost 8000 students from elementary school through college cannot distinguish real from fake news.

GEN Z IN THE CLASSROOM: ADOBEEDUCATION.COM WORLDWIDE STUDY

A very interesting study about Generation Z students and their comfort with technology, their expectations for their education, as well as their perception as well as their teachers’ perception of their creativity, and preparedness for the future. International differences are highlighted showing varying levels of student concern about their education.

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